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by Ellen Harvey

Originally Posted on Book Business March 11, 2016

The Digital Book World Conference & Expo (DBW) notably shifted its attitude towards major technology platforms this year. The platform giants Amazon, Apple, Facebook, and Google were ominously dubbed “The Four Horsemen.” They were referred to as such throughout the conference, and the language used to depict these companies matched the apocalyptic theme. Described as more powerful than most nations in the world and largely free from the confines of the law, these four technology platforms were blamed for the decline of all other forms of media and, it was implied, the decline of society itself.

In the opening keynote of DBW, Jon Taplin director of the USC Annenberg Innovation Lab, explained the damage the Four Horsemen had already done. He said that over the course of the digital revolution, “$50 billion moved from content creators to platform creators. . . The digital revolution isn’t just coming after artists’ incomes, it’s coming after everyone’s jobs.”

In a Wednesday keynote on antitrust and technology, Jonathan Kanter, an antitrust partner at the law firm Cadwalader, Wickersham & Taft, explained that these platforms have captured this market share by becoming massive intermediaries that control the moneymaking side of content, including advertising, search, and adtech. “As these intermediaries get bigger, more money will be stuck in the middle and less money goes to the individual,” explained Kanter.

So how can publishers combat these massive entities? Antitrust enforcement is key. Taplin said that there are legal precedents in the U.S. that support a more equal distribution of technologists’ power, like the antitrust action taken against Bell Laboratories several decades ago. The government demanded that all of its licenses be provided for free for other companies to use. That technology included the microchip, the transistor, the microwave, and a slew of other inventions that consumers and companies have come to rely on. “Think of the possibility if Google had to do the same today,” said Taplin.

Kanter explained that antitrust efforts should focus on areas where the Four Horsemen sacrifice the well-being of their platform to protect their power. “Antitrust laws don’t penalize big,” he said. “They penalize exclusionary conduct.” He gave the example of Google promoting its own products in search listings over those of its competitors. Currently an antitrust case in Europe is investigating this practice. Kanter encouraged that similar action be taken in the U.S.

Both Kanter and Taplin said during their respective keynotes that disintermediation is an effective way to lessen the monopolistic power of the top technology platforms. Kanter identified disintermediation as the next revolution of the digital era, and the biggest fear of the Four Horsemen. “They’re worried about people being able to go direct to a user or buyer,” said Kanter. Taplin added that today’s low-cost distribution systems makes direct sales more attainable for content creators than ever before. He cited the creation of Sunkist, a cooperative of citrus growers that decided to bypass distributors to sell their products directly to retailers, as an example of disintermediation’s success. Taplin added that the Sunkist model is one that book publishers could emulate.

It’s interesting to note the rapid change in rhetoric at DBW, and perhaps a bit sobering too. I remember at last year’s conference representatives from both Apple and Amazon were present to share their plans for the future of the ebook. Although attendees questioned whether these technologists had publishers’ best interests in mind, the sentiment seemed to be that ultimately these tech giants were a necessary evil. Publishers had to play nice in order to succeed. If this year’s conference is any indication, it seems that book publishing leaders are prepared to get much feistier in order to protect their businesses.

TxAuthors will test out products and services to see if they have value in promoting or selling your book. This is the current list of companies that we do not recommend and the reasons why. There is no need for you to waste your money and get little to no results promoting your book(s).

GoRead.com – Why pay $30+ a month to promote a website book store that doesn’t promote you? True, an 80% commission is great, but will you sell thousands of books over a year to justify the expense. Plus, they have top selling books on their site, so all the promotion to them only adds to their sales of everyone else’s books, including best sellers…again, how does that help you?

Authors Uproar – their website is incomplete and full of ‘additional’ products you don’t need.

AwsomeBookPromotion.com – Operates several websites that you pay to have your book promoted. The AwsomeGang promotion lumps you into a list of books being promoted via email, so you get lost in the shuffle and there is not a set genre for each email. It’s anything and everything in the mix.

BookShout is another book promotion email program that promotes more than one book in their email.

If you pay for book promotion you should be the only book promoted either in that email or in that twitter moment. A link should be going directly to a page where they can see and read more about your book and then purchase directly from that site. If you are one of several books, then people will skip over you and you have wasted your money. In addition, the email that your book is listed in should be for books in your same genre, not books from every genre, or a group of books from one genre that has absolutely nothing to do with your book.

We previously wrote that there is an opportunity to create a physical bookstore for Texas Authors. We are still working on the possibility and want to make sure that what we create will work for every Texas Author. Therefore, we are asking for your help with a short simple questionnaire to help guide us.

We are also asking that you share the questionnaire with any and all Texas Author you know. We want to create a tourist destination that increases your book sales and your profit.

If you are a Texas Author, click on Read More to complete the short survey.

Read More

On October 27, 2017, DEAR Texas Radio did a special interview with Tom Blubaugh, a co-founder of the Authors Community. Below is the written aspect of what AC is. Here is the link to the radio show to hear more from Tom about AC and its value to authors: https://soundcloud.com/deartexasradio/dear-texas-read-radio-show-special-with-authors-community

PLEASE NOTE: Recently we discovered that the community will NOT Accept people from every background. TxAuthors has ALWAYS been about inclusion and promoting a positive atmosphere for EVERYONE! For this reason we CAN NOT recommend this community.

What is it?

Authors Community is a community of like-minded people to learn from and find resources necessary to complete your writing project and market the finished product. We offer personal consulting with our experienced marketing staff: Tom Blubaugh, Gina Burgess, and Tamy Bond. Together, we have established an online membership community leveraging multiple service levels. This enables personal and custom services tailored to you as an individual writer.

While the concept sounds great, we again must be clear that any organization that discriminates against anyone is not a healthy, positive organization to belong to.

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About BMC

Bourgeois Media & Consulting began as a full service publishing house and has grown into the leading advocate for authors.  Through the leadership of B Alan Bourgeois, BMC has been instrumental in creating new programs that benefit Texas Authors and has moved into the international publishing world slowly and quietly.